Quantcast

Woman Has Her Period For 5 Years - Doctors Reveal Why

Most women get their period for five to seven days per month, but excessive periods are a sure sign something is wrong. One young woman didn't understand why her period just wouldn't stop, but she let it go on for five years before she sought help.

Chloe Christos was 14 years old when, like most girls, she began menstruating. Unlike most girls, she never stopped. Her first period went on for five years. While the average woman loses about 2 ounces of blood per day when they have their period, Christos was dangerously losing around twice that amount per day for 5 years.

"Day to day my life was literally being cared for by my mother," said the young Australia girl to Daily Mail Australia. "I couldn’t do anything... I was fainting a lot, I had dangerously low blood pressure, and it wasn’t really a good idea for me to drive or go out."

"I knew it wasn't quite right, but I was also embarrassed to talk about it. I felt very different and pretty alone," Christos, now 27, revealed to ABC News.

When she finally got medical help, she was diagnosed with Von Willebrand disease, a genetic disorder caused by an inability to clot properly.

After being diagnosed, Christos went synthetic drug therapy that caused terrible side effects for years to come. It would alleviate the bleeding, but only for a few hours.

Doctors suggested the young woman go for a hysterectomy, but she wasn't ready to resort to that. Finally, a center offered her a treatment traditionally used for hemophilia, a condition long thought to only affect men.

The treatment is working, and Christos is amazed; she actually had a normal period.

Christos is using her story to help others. Because hemophilia was thought of as a man's disease, women have often been dismissed by doctors when it comes to bleeding disorders. She's advocating for equal rights for women with bleeding disorders. She's started a GoFundMe campaign to help her get to the World Federation of Hemophilia World Congress in Orlando so she can advocate.

"Getting the right diagnosis first of all is an issue in itself," said Christos. "Helping people find an adequate treatment plan, that’s another thing."

Source: MailOnline
Photo: Newsner

Tell Us What You Think

More News Stories

The furor over the National Anthem controversy that surrounds the National Football League has died down for the most part, but there’s still...

Being a member of the former first family comes with some serious pros and cons, one of the main cons being the incredible amount of scrutiny one...

When Bruce Jenner first began transitioning to Caitlyn Jenner, she dodged the question about surgery. "It’s nobody’s business whether I want to do...

On Saturday, Chicago restaurant Cochon Volant had to apologize to a military veteran for kicking him and his service dog out of the restaurant....

Did you ever think that a lamp could have health benefits? Surprisingly, one does. The Himalayan Pink Salt Lamp just might be the easiest thing...

Latest News Stories

Donald Trump declared Wednesday that he is boycotting Fox News because its reporters have covered his presidential campaign “very unfairly.”

...

It doesn’t take much to get the mainstream press all riled up when it comes to President Donald Trump. The commander-in-chief is torn to shreds on...

If Donald Trump wins the 2016 presidential election, Sarah Palin may potentially serve as Energy secretary, as she puts it "energy is my baby." On...

A young mother from Washington decided to have a home birth. She already had two children and she wanted the entire family to be present for the...

Former President Barack Obama's presidential library is being planned for the south side of Chicago, and is expected to also contain a museum....