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Woman Has Her Period For 5 Years - Doctors Reveal Why

Most women get their period for five to seven days per month, but excessive periods are a sure sign something is wrong. One young woman didn't understand why her period just wouldn't stop, but she let it go on for five years before she sought help.

Chloe Christos was 14 years old when, like most girls, she began menstruating. Unlike most girls, she never stopped. Her first period went on for five years. While the average woman loses about 2 ounces of blood per day when they have their period, Christos was dangerously losing around twice that amount per day for 5 years.

"Day to day my life was literally being cared for by my mother," said the young Australia girl to Daily Mail Australia. "I couldn’t do anything... I was fainting a lot, I had dangerously low blood pressure, and it wasn’t really a good idea for me to drive or go out."

"I knew it wasn't quite right, but I was also embarrassed to talk about it. I felt very different and pretty alone," Christos, now 27, revealed to ABC News.

When she finally got medical help, she was diagnosed with Von Willebrand disease, a genetic disorder caused by an inability to clot properly.

After being diagnosed, Christos went synthetic drug therapy that caused terrible side effects for years to come. It would alleviate the bleeding, but only for a few hours.

Doctors suggested the young woman go for a hysterectomy, but she wasn't ready to resort to that. Finally, a center offered her a treatment traditionally used for hemophilia, a condition long thought to only affect men.

The treatment is working, and Christos is amazed; she actually had a normal period.

Christos is using her story to help others. Because hemophilia was thought of as a man's disease, women have often been dismissed by doctors when it comes to bleeding disorders. She's advocating for equal rights for women with bleeding disorders. She's started a GoFundMe campaign to help her get to the World Federation of Hemophilia World Congress in Orlando so she can advocate.

"Getting the right diagnosis first of all is an issue in itself," said Christos. "Helping people find an adequate treatment plan, that’s another thing."

Source: MailOnline
Photo: Newsner

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