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Student Confused By 'White Privilege Checklist', Now The University It Being Called Out

A new display in a University of Minnesota residence hall that offers an 11-point “checklist” to help students identify their “white privilege” is resulting in a serious controversy.

The “White Privilege Checklist” includes 11 statements that seemingly apply only to white people.

“I can arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time,” is the first item on the list, followed by references to being able to see “people of my color” or “people of my race” in popular culture and discussions of national heritage.

“I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed,” the second item notes.

The fifth statement suggests that children of color are not able to learn about their race in our educational system, pointing out that white schoolchildren experience privilege through constant exposure to “curricular materials that testify to the existence of their race.”

“I can go into a music shop and count on finding the music of my race represented,” claims statement #6, going on to note that privilege also means finding “the food I grew up with” at the grocery store and locating “someone who can deal with my hair” at a beauty salon.

“Whether I use checks, credit cards, or cash, I can count on my skin color not to work against the appearance of financial responsibility,” the seventh item argues.

The White Privilege Checklist #8 reads:

“I am not made acutely aware that my shape, bearing, or body odor will be taken as a reflection on my race,” one such statement reads, followed by, “I can worry about racism without being seen as self-interested or self-seeking” and “I can be late to a meeting without having the lateness reflect on my race.”

Statement 10 notes that white privilege means the ability to take a job or enroll in an affirmative action institution “without having my co-workers or peers assume I got it because of my race.”

Evan Christenson is a student at the University of Minnesota who photographed the board and posted about it on social media, and he noted he believes the display “attacks the individual and not the idea,” and does not really open up opportunities for dialogue about the issue.

“I do believe it crosses the line. When it attacks the individual and not the idea, there is a problem,” Christenson commented. “I am not inherently racist because I don't believe in white privilege. I believe there needs to be dialogue on the subject but it needs to more of a give and take and not a one-sided affair.”

Source: Fox News Insider
Photo: Twitter

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