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Here's What The 'SSSS' Code At The Bottom Of Your Boarding Pass Means

Flying can be a gigantic pain in the neck these days, but that’s a harsh reality of the world that we live in. Unfortunately, there are bad guys out there that want to do bad things. As such, we need extensive security to ensure that one of those bad guys isn’t getting a hold of a plane or bringing horrible stuff on board. That’s a gigantic drag for the good guys that simply want to get from point A to point B, as it means they’re going to have to deal with delays and hassles.

While it can be hard to see the bright side when you’re in a cramped line and praying for it to move along quicker, it comes in the form of the fact that it’s another key step to ensuring all of our safety. If that doesn’t do it for you, here’s another thought: it could be a whole lot worse. You could find yourself with one of these super secret codes slapped on your boarding pass, and then you’d find yourself dealing with even more delays. So what’s the code to watch out for?

As the Daily Mail shares, if you see the code ‘SSSS’ on your boarding pass, it’s not a code to be celebrated. There’s no preferred seating or VIP lounge access here, but rather a clear sign to everyone that comes in contact with your boarding pass that you need to be given the once over. The code applies to travellers flying into the United States, and it stands for 'Secondary Security Screening Selection.’

“It means the pass holder has been selected to undergo a more extensive security screening process before boarding their flight that can take up to half an hour. The screening process, which may include bag searches, pat downs and validating identity, is conducted by the Transportation Security Administration,” the Mail reports. “The TSA insists travellers who receive the 'SSSS' are selected at random, but some have claimed they are pulled aside most times they travel, according to Lifehacker.”

While the code could lead to even more conundrums for completely innocent passengers, it’s still an interesting look at the security protocols that are currently in place. While the TSA claims it happens at random, that would make it unlikely that travelers would have it happen to them multiple times.

“Buying one-way tickets or paying in cash could land passengers on the TSA's secret list and lead to frequent 'SSSS' checks, the publication said,” the Mail adds. “A passenger may be able to tell they will have to undergo additional checks if they are unable to print their boarding pass at the airport's self-check-in.”

Paying in cash for large expenditures is considered a red flag in a number of cases, so it would make sense to extend that to airline travel as well. In short, all of the security protocols can be incredibly irritating when you’re rushing to make a flight. However, it doesn’t seem all that bad when you consider the alternatives of not having rigid procedures in place.

Source: Daily Mail
Photo: YouTube

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