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Here’s What It Means If Someone Is Wearing A Safety Pin

If you travel in very liberal or progressive circles, you may have noticed some people (mostly white people) donning a new accessory: a safety pin. If the growing number of pins on shirts has you perplexed, here's what they mean; and here's why many people think the trend should stop.

The safety pin has become a popular item for people to wear to show solidarity with minorities. Rumor has it that wearing safety pins goes all the way back to Europe and WWII, when someone might have worn one to show Jews being persecuted that they had their back. While the rumors aren't founded, we do know that the safety pin trend at least goes back to Brexit.

Wearing a safety pin has become trendy in America for the anti-Trump crowd. It's supposed to mean that minorities, such as black people, Muslims, undocumented immigrants and LGBTQ people are 'safe' with the wearer. The wearer of the safety pin is making a pledge to protect people against the president, who has the audacity to want to enforce the law and tighten security in the nation.

Many are criticizing the symbol as nothing but ‘slacktivism,' or slack activism. It's so easy to put a pin on your lapel and go out and about your daily business, smiling at minorities as though you've done something great for them. It takes a lot more work, however, to actually put your money and time where your mouth is.

Are you willing to open your home to a homeless transgendered teen who has been kicked out by his family? Would you offer your own hard-earned money to pay for an undocumented family's legal fees? How often do you feel you can roll up your sleeves and head over to inner city communities to help people of color make improvements to their homes, or to help them patrol their neighborhoods? Are you willing to jump in and protect someone who is being threatened, or attacked?

If not, according to people who are no fans of the movement, you should leave your safety pins in the sewing kit. They claim the safety pin is just the latest device to assuage white guilt and show off identity politics.

You’d be doing a much better service with your pin by giving it to a homeless person trying to hold up ill-fitting pants than putting it on your shirt to make you feel like a good person.

Source: AWM
Photo: AWM

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