Do You Like Baby Carrots? You Might Want To Stop Eating Them, They Could Make You Sick

There are dozens of articles on the internet right now that are warning people not to eat baby carrots. These carrots are just sub-par specimens that companies soak in bleach. How much truth is there to these claims, and what does this mean for carrot lovers?

The claims are fairly accurate. Baby carrots were an idea that a farmer came up with in the 1980s. He was throwing a lot of carrots away because nature did not take the course of producing a long, smooth, attractive carrot. He took carrots that were too short, twisted or deformed and shaved them down to a cute little nub, and he gave it a cute little name: baby carrot.

Baby carrots caught on so much that now farmers actually grow them intentionally. Because they're small they grow more quickly and can be spaced closer together, thus upping the carrot harvest yield.

The down side of this, a lot of websites are reporting, is that these carrots just don't develop some of the high levels of nutrients that their big brothers do. And this is true - except their big brothers sitting in supermarket storage or on supermarket shelves have lost a lot of their nutritional punch as well.

If you really want to make sure your carrots are providing you with the highest nutritional value possible, you should buy local farm fresh carrots, or organic from a reputable merchant. But if you prefer lower prices and convenience, and aren't worried about your carrots being slightly nutritionally inferior, it doesn't matter much which carrots you pick up at the supermarket.

One of the big concerns about baby carrots these days is that they're soaked in chlorine bleach. This is true; federal regulations allow for your peeled carrots to be run through a very diluted chlorine water-solution. Many articles will raise concerns about eating carrots contaminated with chemicals.

Again, the claims are true, but not well explained. If you fear the chlorine solution, you should also ditch your bagged salads, lettuce, spinach, greens, celery sticks and other pre-packaged produce. This bleach solution is industry standard with all cut vegetables - including organic products. It's considered safe; the e-coli and other bacteria it helps prevent are not safe.

Source: AWM
Photo: AWM

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